LADIES LOVE SCIENCE!

WE LOVE SCIENCE AND WE LOVE YOU.

women-in-science:

shattered-earth:

I present, a microbiologist magical girl! Or a microbe magical girl, whichever you prefer i guess, with guest stars from Moyashimon Microbes!

This was a commission from a really cool MCB grad student, and i was more than happy to work on it because it combines so many many many of my favorite things :D I was basically given more or less free reign with some input on the science side of things, so cookies to people who see all the little references in the picture to microbiology and lab work :3 I may do a rework of this with generic microbes and not moyashimon ones to bring to otakon and awa as a print, but we’ll see in a week or two. 

I wanted to post this earlier but a giant headache basically pooped on the last 8 hours of my life v_v

Her staff is an inoculation loop. Too cute!

UM OMG THIS IS AMAZING

LLS

historywithwomen:

Anna Fisher (24 August 1949 – present)
Anna Lee Tingle Fisher is an American chemist and a NASA astronaut. Formerly married to fellow astronaut Bill Fisher, and the mother of two children, in 1984 she became the first mother in space. Fisher is the oldest active American astronaut.During her career at NASA, she has been involved with three major programs: the Space Shuttle, the International Space Station and the Orion project.
Fisher, who still works in management at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, earned a B.S. in chemistry in ‘71 and an M.D. in ’76, before being chosen an astronaut in 1978. Her training class, the first female astronauts recruited by NASA, included Sally Ride, the first U.S. woman in space, and Judith Resnik, who died when Space Shuttle Challenger was destroyed during launch in January 1986.
She assigned to her first flight two weeks before giving birth to her oldest child, Fisher delivered Kristin on a Friday and was back in the office three days later for a Monday meeting.In 1984, on a mission to recover two failed satellites expensively orbiting Earth, Fisher became the first mother to enter space. And if you think that’s no small feat, then you’ve never had a 16-month-old child at home who you weren’t sure you were going to ever see again.
Dr. Fisher has been paired with Ian S. McLean, professor and vice chair of physics & astronomy and director, UCLA Infrared Laboratory for Astrophysics. They will talk about “Watching the Skies: Bruins in Space” on Saturday, May 15.
Fisher’s mission was a success and she was assigned to a second flight, the shuttle that would follow the Challenger disaster. But Fisher and her husband decided to have another daughter and this time Fisher took a leave of absence. She returned seven years later, in 1996, and did some of the testing of the Space Station’s robotic arm before it was transported up.

historywithwomen:

Anna Fisher (24 August 1949 – present)

Anna Lee Tingle Fisher is an American chemist and a NASA astronaut. Formerly married to fellow astronaut Bill Fisher, and the mother of two children, in 1984 she became the first mother in space. Fisher is the oldest active American astronaut.During her career at NASA, she has been involved with three major programs: the Space Shuttle, the International Space Station and the Orion project.

Fisher, who still works in management at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, earned a B.S. in chemistry in ‘71 and an M.D. in ’76, before being chosen an astronaut in 1978. Her training class, the first female astronauts recruited by NASA, included Sally Ride, the first U.S. woman in space, and Judith Resnik, who died when Space Shuttle Challenger was destroyed during launch in January 1986.

She assigned to her first flight two weeks before giving birth to her oldest child, Fisher delivered Kristin on a Friday and was back in the office three days later for a Monday meeting.In 1984, on a mission to recover two failed satellites expensively orbiting Earth, Fisher became the first mother to enter space. And if you think that’s no small feat, then you’ve never had a 16-month-old child at home who you weren’t sure you were going to ever see again.

Dr. Fisher has been paired with Ian S. McLean, professor and vice chair of physics & astronomy and director, UCLA Infrared Laboratory for Astrophysics. They will talk about “Watching the Skies: Bruins in Space” on Saturday, May 15.

Fisher’s mission was a success and she was assigned to a second flight, the shuttle that would follow the Challenger disaster. But Fisher and her husband decided to have another daughter and this time Fisher took a leave of absence. She returned seven years later, in 1996, and did some of the testing of the Space Station’s robotic arm before it was transported up.

thebrainscoop:

wearemtblog:

One of the coolest hidden features on UM’s campus is the Philip L. Wright Zoological Museum. The museum contains more than 24,000 specimens of vertebrates, including birds, mammals and fish. It is the largest zoological collection in Montana and one of the major zoological collections representing the Northern Rocky Mountains.

These photos feature some of the beautiful specimens in the collection, as well as former curator David Dyer and Emily Graslie before she moved her educational YouTube show “The Brain Scoop” to the renowned Field Museum in Chicago.

Photos by Todd Goodrich, originally shot for Montanan: The Magazine of The University of Montana.

Oh, I was not at all expecting to be bulldozed by nostalgia this morning.

I miss you, Montana. I’ll love that Museum till the end of my days.

classicethnichistoricalvibez:

President and Nuclear Physicist pf Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, pictured here in 1973, was the first African American woman to earn a PhD in Nuclear Physics from MIT (same year as the image).  Mrs. Jackson is also known for holding office as former Chairman of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, appointed by President William Clinton

classicethnichistoricalvibez:

President and Nuclear Physicist pf Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, pictured here in 1973, was the first African American woman to earn a PhD in Nuclear Physics from MIT (same year as the image).

Mrs. Jackson is also known for holding office as former Chairman of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, appointed by President William Clinton

womeninspace:

womeninspace:

Fatima Dyczynski passed away in MH17 bombing
Fatima Dyczynski was the founder of Xoterra Space and a fellow student of mine at the space systems engineering departement of Delft University of Technology. I did not know Fatima personally, but it was clear to all she was an ambitious woman with a bright future ahead. Her mission was to make a difference and make space personal.
Fatima was flying to Perth to meet her parents and take on a job at IBM. My thought and condolences go out to her family and friends. I wish them strength in these terrible days.

In honor of Fatima the faculty of Aerospace Engineering at the Delft University of Technology (DUT) have established a prize for Msc.  students at DUT. The prize aims to encourage space innovation and entrepreneurship.
Read more on the "Fatima Dyczynski Prize on Space Innovation and Entrepreneurship"

womeninspace:

womeninspace:

Fatima Dyczynski passed away in MH17 bombing

Fatima Dyczynski was the founder of Xoterra Space and a fellow student of mine at the space systems engineering departement of Delft University of Technology. I did not know Fatima personally, but it was clear to all she was an ambitious woman with a bright future ahead. Her mission was to make a difference and make space personal.

Fatima was flying to Perth to meet her parents and take on a job at IBM. My thought and condolences go out to her family and friends. I wish them strength in these terrible days.

In honor of Fatima the faculty of Aerospace Engineering at the Delft University of Technology (DUT) have established a prize for Msc.  students at DUT. The prize aims to encourage space innovation and entrepreneurship.

Read more on the "Fatima Dyczynski Prize on Space Innovation and Entrepreneurship"

mo-mtn-girl:

ladieslovescience:

Sixth grader, Florida resident, and scientist extraordinaire, Lauren Arrington has done pretty well for herself at the ripe old age of twelve. Her science fair project studied lionfish (an invasive species in the ocean around Florida) and where they are able to survive. She determined that lionfish could survive in near-fresh water, which would included some rivers in Florida and would allow the species to invade further upstream and possibly cause further damage to Florida coast marine ecosystems. The results of Arrington’s simple project— where she placed lionfish in tanks of water with salinity levels— were news to marine biologists, who had not considered that lionfish might be able to survive in lower salinity levels than 20 parts per thousand.

LLS

Again. Dr. Jud needs to be credited. We have to support our fellow professional biologists who are trying to make a name for themselves. This was originally discovered in 2010 by Dr. Zack Jud. 

See HERE

He’s upset and rightfully so. 

The fact that the little girl is so excited about science is an amazing thing but her parents are being completely unethical. 

It’s a shame that this is happening right before the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists meeting in Chattanooga TN. 

Many thanks to you for alerting us on this issue! Giving scientists credit for their work is incredibly important and we in no way intended to skip over Dr. Jud— we were simply unaware of the previous research based on the article we read. Sorry everybody!

LLS

stemettes:

#HeadStemette has been busy this morning at a #photoshoot for a magazine #oohfancy #womenintech

You go, girl!LLS

stemettes:

#HeadStemette has been busy this morning at a #photoshoot for a magazine #oohfancy #womenintech

You go, girl!

LLS

Calliope's Honoring her Parents. »

periodtalkwith:

calliowong:

Hey, everyone.

It’s been over a year now since I started my campaign for trans woman inclusion at Smith College, and I’ve kept silent. I’ve not made any dorky Sherlock jokes or started any conversations about trans equality here, although—in case you’re wondering—I’ve been busy with other…

Hey, all! Calliope is one of the most wonderful & inspiring women I know. She’s raising money to pay back her parents the $20,000 that they have committed to funding her transition costs, and it would be great if you could donate, or at least share! The donation page is here. Much love, folks!

Hey everyone, a short break from our usual science programming to ask you all to donate or reblog, and help Calliope out!