LADIES LOVE SCIENCE!

WE LOVE SCIENCE AND WE LOVE YOU.

stemettes:

#HeadStemette has been busy this morning at a #photoshoot for a magazine #oohfancy #womenintech

You go, girl!LLS

stemettes:

#HeadStemette has been busy this morning at a #photoshoot for a magazine #oohfancy #womenintech

You go, girl!

LLS

Calliope's Honoring her Parents. »

periodtalkwith:

calliowong:

Hey, everyone.

It’s been over a year now since I started my campaign for trans woman inclusion at Smith College, and I’ve kept silent. I’ve not made any dorky Sherlock jokes or started any conversations about trans equality here, although—in case you’re wondering—I’ve been busy with other…

Hey, all! Calliope is one of the most wonderful & inspiring women I know. She’s raising money to pay back her parents the $20,000 that they have committed to funding her transition costs, and it would be great if you could donate, or at least share! The donation page is here. Much love, folks!

Hey everyone, a short break from our usual science programming to ask you all to donate or reblog, and help Calliope out!

scientific-women:

sweetteascience:

sagansense:

Just took the “Do you know more about science and technology than the average American?” quiz: http://www.pewresearch.org/quiz/science-knowledge/

Take part in it yourself, then pay it forward :)

Really interesting quiz! I wish I could say I got them all correct, but 12/13 is still acceptable, right?!

I only missed the atmosphere question, but I was torn between two! Damn.

This was a pretty interesting quiz to take! We, too, missed that atmosphere question— but that was all! Let us know how you all do!

LLS

scienceyoucanlove:

Stephanie Kwolek

Inventor of Kevlar®

Stephanie Kwolek, the famous woman inventor and scientist, wanted to study medicine while growing up in New Kensington, Pennsylvania, and that desire persisted as she worked toward her B.A. in chemistry at Carnegie Mellon University. After finishing her degree, however, Kwolek took a temporary research position with DuPont, where her work turned out to be so interesting that she decided to stay on.

One of the first women research chemists, she first gained national recognition in 1960 for her work with long molecule chains at low temperatures. In 1971, Kwolek’s further analysis culminated in an important discovery of a liquid crystalline polymer solution. Its exceptional strength and stiffness led to the invention of Kevlar®, a synthetic material that is five times as strong as steel.

Kevlar® is resistant to wear, corrosion and flames, and it is the main ingredient in the production of bulletproof vests, which have become invaluable to legions of soldiers and law enforcement officers. Furthermore, Kevlar® is used in dozens of other products, including skis, safety helmets, hiking and camping gear, and suspension bridge cables.

Kwolek’s research efforts have resulted in her being the recipient or co-recipient of 17 U.S. patents. This noted woman inventor also has received such prestigious accolades as the Kilby Award, the National Medal of Technology and the 1999 Lemelson-MIT Lifetime Achievement Award

Celebrate IDG 2014 at the 2nd Annual Girls Speak Out »

Hey so: this is not science, but it sure as heck is ladies! If you are a girl age 18 or younger, we (not LLS, but we as people are helping with this project) are looking for stories about WHAT IT MEANS TO BE A GIRL WHERE YOU LIVE to be performed live at International Day of the Girl this year! If you’ve got an answer to that prompt, please submit! (info about submitting is through the link) We hope to see your submissions, & please reblog to spread the word!

Girl, 12, from Palm Beach County, credited for breakthrough in lionfish research »

AH OMG THIS IS SO COOL!

LLS

hypatiasclubhouse:

Sofia Vasilyevna Kovalevskaya (15 January 1850 – 10 February 1891) 
Sofia was the first major Russian female mathematician, responsible for important original contributions to analysis, differential equations and mechanics, and the first woman appointed to a full professorship in Northern Europe. She was also one of the first women to work for a scientific journal as an editor and an advocate of women’s rights in the 19th century. It was her struggle to obtain the best education available which began to open doors at universities to women. In addition, her ground-breaking work in mathematics made her male counterparts reconsider their archaic notions of women’s inferiority to men in such scientific arenas. 
During her career she published ten papers in mathematics and mathematical physics and also several literary works. Many of these scientific papers were ground-breaking theories or the impetus for future discoveries. The President of the Academy of Sciences, which awarded Sofia the Prix Bordin, once said: “Our co-members have found that her work bears witness not only to profound and broad knowledge, but to a mind of great inventiveness” [x][x]


I did a report on her earlier this year! This is one fantastic gal.LLS

hypatiasclubhouse:

Sofia Vasilyevna Kovalevskaya (15 January 1850 – 10 February 1891)

Sofia was the first major Russian female mathematician, responsible for important original contributions to analysis, differential equations and mechanics, and the first woman appointed to a full professorship in Northern Europe. She was also one of the first women to work for a scientific journal as an editor and an advocate of women’s rights in the 19th century. It was her struggle to obtain the best education available which began to open doors at universities to women. In addition, her ground-breaking work in mathematics made her male counterparts reconsider their archaic notions of women’s inferiority to men in such scientific arenas. 

During her career she published ten papers in mathematics and mathematical physics and also several literary works. Many of these scientific papers were ground-breaking theories or the impetus for future discoveries. The President of the Academy of Sciences, which awarded Sofia the Prix Bordin, once said: “Our co-members have found that her work bears witness not only to profound and broad knowledge, but to a mind of great inventiveness” [x][x]

I did a report on her earlier this year! This is one fantastic gal.

LLS