LADIES LOVE SCIENCE!

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tech-girls:

Super-Awesome Sylvia interviewed for Girls in ICT Day! She says tech is important to her because “you can shape your future, you can shape your world.” Awesome!

(via womenrockscience)

womenrockscience:

Rocket Girls Part 1: Elsie MacGill

Meet Elsie MacGill, a legend in aircraft design and production and the first female aircraft designer in the world. In 1938 she became Chief Aeronautical Engineer at Canadian Car and Foundry where she led the production and redesign of several planes including the Hawker Hurricane – the plane responsible for the most British victories in WWII. Most of the employees in the factory were women and by the wars end they had produced 1,400 aircraft, a massive feat. Elsie had forged new techniques for aeroplane production and mass production and won the Gzowski Medal for this work.

Elsie insisted on being the first one to test each and every one of her designs, a dangerous practice that gained her much respect amongst the pilots. She had a disability that virtually paralysed her from the waist down so she couldn’t ever pilot a plane herself. She would be carried into the planes by her colleagues and test the flights as a passenger recording changes and observations. By the wars end Elsie was a national hero and became known as the Hurricane Queen.

Elsie went on to become Chair of a UN aviation committee and led the drafting of the first International Airworthiness Regulations. She is the first woman to chair a UN committee. The daughter and granddaughter of feminist activist Elsie was heavily involved in the suffrage movement. Her accomplishments for women’s rights are almost as impressive as her accomplishments in the air. She campaigned for equal pay, the decriminalisation of abortion, justice for native women, and so much more. She is a legend of women’s rights and aviation.


Sources: Northern Lights Award, Wings of Canada, Collections

Part 2 Tomorrow: Sex, Bling and Gliders the story of Barbara Cartland

(via stemettes)

womenrockscience:

Rocket Girls: A Five day series into legends of aerospace engineering

(via stemettes)

taishou-kun:

Women observing stars.  1936, Japan

Artist Oota choou 太田聴雨 (1896-1958)

Hoshi wo miru josei 星をみる女性  - 

(via japhers)

scientific-women:

Born: 1890; Died July 25, 1980

place: Washington, D.C.

 BA Smith College (1914); MA education, University of Chicago

 Ph.D. (Mathematics) Catholic University, 1943 thesis: Determination of Sets of Independent Conditions Characterizing Certain Special Cases of Symmetric Correspondences, advisor: Aubrey Landry

In 1943, Euphemia Lofton Haynes earned her Ph.D. in Mathematics at The Catholic University in Washington, D.C., thus becoming the first African American Woman Ph. D. in Mathematics.

Born Martha Euphemia Lofton, Euphremia (she rarely used Martha) was a fourth generation Washingtonian, her father was Dr. William S. Lofton, a prominent Black D.C. dentist and financier of Black businesses in the area. Her mother, Lavinia Day Lofton, was active in the Catholic church as later was Euphemia. She graduated high school from Washington’s Miner Normal School in 1909. Four years later, she received a B.A. in Mathematics (minor in Psychology). In 1917, she married Harold Appo Haynes who later became a principal and deputy superintendent in charge of Washington’s “colored schools” (the schools for African Americans).

In 1930, Haynes received a masters degree in education from the University of Chicago, where she also did further graduate study in mathematics. She earned a doctorate degree in mathematics from Catholic University of America (CUA) in 1943, becoming the first black woman to receive a Ph.D. degree in mathematics. The title of her dissertation was “The Determination of Sets of Independent Conditions Characterizing Certain Special Cases of Symmetric Correspondences;” Dr. Aubrey Landrey was her dissertation advisor and Drs. Otto J. Ramler and J. Nelson Rice were members of her doctoral committee.

Dr. Euphemia Haynes had a distinguished career in Washington. She taught in the public schools of Washington, DC for forty-seven years and was the first woman to chair the DC School Board. She was a teacher of first grade at Garrison and Garfield Schools; a teacher of mathematics at Armstrong High School, an English teacher at Miner Normal School; she taught mathematics and served as chair of the Mathematics Department at Dunbar High School; she was a professor of mathematics at Miner Teachers College (established the mathematics department) and at the District of Columbia Teachers College for which she also served as chair of the Division of Mathematics and Business Education. After her 1959 retirement from the public school system, he was head of the city’s Board of Education, and was central to the integration of the DC public schools.

Dr. Haynes established the mathematics department at Miners Teacher’s College she was a professor of mathematics. She taught at the District of Columbia Teachers College for which she also served as chair of the Division of Mathematics and Business Education. She occasionally taught part-time at Howard University.

Haynes was active in many community activities. She served as first vice president of the Archdiocesan Council of Catholic Women, chairman of the Advisory Board of Fides Neighborhood House, on the Committee of International Social Welfare, on the Executive Committee of the National Social Welfare Assembly, as secretary and member of the Executive Committee of the DC Health and Welfare Council, on the local and national committees of the United Service Organization, and as a member of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, Catholic Interracial Council of Washington, the Urban League, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, League of Women Voters, and the American Association of University Women.

Euphemia Lofton Haynes was awarded the Papal Medal - Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice from the Catholic Church in 1959.

Upon her death in 1980, she bequeathed $700,000 to Catholic University in a trust fund established to support a professorial chair and student loan fund in the School of Education. Thus, there is a scholarship fund and a education department chair named in honor of Dr. Euphemia Lofton Haynes at The Catholic University.

Regarding the chair in her honor, the following is from the CUA School of Education Newsletter for January 1981, page 1: “The School of Education (ED) recently received a gift of $700,000 in the form of a bequest from Euphemia L. Haynes, an alumna of the university and a prominent Washington educator, who died earlier this year. The gift was willed to the university in a trust fund Mrs. Haynes established for the the support of a professorial chair in ED.”

scientific-women:

Born: 1890; Died July 25, 1980

place: Washington, D.C.

BA Smith College (1914); MA education, University of Chicago

Ph.D. (Mathematics) Catholic University, 1943
thesis: Determination of Sets of Independent Conditions Characterizing Certain Special Cases of Symmetric Correspondences, advisor: Aubrey Landry

In 1943, Euphemia Lofton Haynes earned her Ph.D. in Mathematics at The Catholic University in Washington, D.C., thus becoming the first African American Woman Ph. D. in Mathematics.

Born Martha Euphemia Lofton, Euphremia (she rarely used Martha) was a fourth generation Washingtonian, her father was Dr. William S. Lofton, a prominent Black D.C. dentist and financier of Black businesses in the area. Her mother, Lavinia Day Lofton, was active in the Catholic church as later was Euphemia. She graduated high school from Washington’s Miner Normal School in 1909. Four years later, she received a B.A. in Mathematics (minor in Psychology). In 1917, she married Harold Appo Haynes who later became a principal and deputy superintendent in charge of Washington’s “colored schools” (the schools for African Americans).

In 1930, Haynes received a masters degree in education from the University of Chicago, where she also did further graduate study in mathematics. She earned a doctorate degree in mathematics from Catholic University of America (CUA) in 1943, becoming the first black woman to receive a Ph.D. degree in mathematics. The title of her dissertation was “The Determination of Sets of Independent Conditions Characterizing Certain Special Cases of Symmetric Correspondences;” Dr. Aubrey Landrey was her dissertation advisor and Drs. Otto J. Ramler and J. Nelson Rice were members of her doctoral committee.

Dr. Euphemia Haynes had a distinguished career in Washington. She taught in the public schools of Washington, DC for forty-seven years and was the first woman to chair the DC School Board. She was a teacher of first grade at Garrison and Garfield Schools; a teacher of mathematics at Armstrong High School, an English teacher at Miner Normal School; she taught mathematics and served as chair of the Mathematics Department at Dunbar High School; she was a professor of mathematics at Miner Teachers College (established the mathematics department) and at the District of Columbia Teachers College for which she also served as chair of the Division of Mathematics and Business Education. After her 1959 retirement from the public school system, he was head of the city’s Board of Education, and was central to the integration of the DC public schools.

Dr. Haynes established the mathematics department at Miners Teacher’s College she was a professor of mathematics. She taught at the District of Columbia Teachers College for which she also served as chair of the Division of Mathematics and Business Education. She occasionally taught part-time at Howard University.

Haynes was active in many community activities. She served as first vice president of the Archdiocesan Council of Catholic Women, chairman of the Advisory Board of Fides Neighborhood House, on the Committee of International Social Welfare, on the Executive Committee of the National Social Welfare Assembly, as secretary and member of the Executive Committee of the DC Health and Welfare Council, on the local and national committees of the United Service Organization, and as a member of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, Catholic Interracial Council of Washington, the Urban League, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, League of Women Voters, and the American Association of University Women.

Euphemia Lofton Haynes was awarded the Papal Medal - Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice from the Catholic Church in 1959.

Upon her death in 1980, she bequeathed $700,000 to Catholic University in a trust fund established to support a professorial chair and student loan fund in the School of Education. Thus, there is a scholarship fund and a education department chair named in honor of Dr. Euphemia Lofton Haynes at The Catholic University.

Regarding the chair in her honor, the following is from the CUA School of Education Newsletter for January 1981, page 1: “The School of Education (ED) recently received a gift of $700,000 in the form of a bequest from Euphemia L. Haynes, an alumna of the university and a prominent Washington educator, who died earlier this year. The gift was willed to the university in a trust fund Mrs. Haynes established for the the support of a professorial chair in ED.”

engineeringpoodles:

ladieslovescience:

keepcalmandprogram:

Girl Develop It is at it again!

This new cartoon wants to inspire girls to become engineers.

So awesome.

um, cool!

LLS

This needs a boost, there are only 17 days left and they’re at $1100 out of their $25,000 goal.  They’re doing flexible funding on indiegogo, so they’ll get the funds regardless, but it would be nice to see them have what they need to get it done.

You heard engineeringpoodles! Got a bit of money on hand right now? Looking for a fabulous cause? Bored with your yearly donation to public radio (jk, we love publicradio always and forever)?  Try this Indiegogo fundraiser on for size! Support science, girls, and awesome cartoons, all in one donation.

LLS

black-nata:

[curls up in a tiny ball and screeches]

We love Jane, fabulous scientist lady.

LLS

(via homenumrevelio)

keepcalmandprogram:

Girl Develop It is at it again!

This new cartoon wants to inspire girls to become engineers.

So awesome.

um, cool!

LLS

(via stemettes)

kenobi-wan-obi:

Representation in STEM: Black Women Making Their Mark in Space and Science

Today, there is an increased push for the American education system to improve their STEM programs as well as to get students to show interest in the fields. It is important to bring attention to some of the African-American females that have, and are still, paving the road for future scientists, astronauts or any STEM degree holders.

These women are just some of the many examples of African-American contributions to science. (Descriptions pertain to the women in the order they appear on the photoset, from up down, left right)

Mercedes Richards PH.D is a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Pennsylvania State University. Originally from Jamaica, Dr. Richards received her Doctoral degree at the University of Toronto. In 2010 Dr. Richards received the Fulbright Award to conduct research at the Astronomical Institute in Slovakia. research focus is on binary stars; twin stars formed at the same time.

Willie Hobbs Moore PH.D is the first African-American woman to earn a PH.D in physics in 1972. She received it at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. Her thesis research involved important problems in vibrational analysis of macro molecules.

Beth Brown PH.D (1969-2008) was an Astrophysicist in the Sciences and Exploration Directorate at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Born in Roanoke, VA, she grew up watching Star Trek and Star Wars and was fascinated with space. In 1998, Dr. Brown becoming the first African-American woman to earn a doctorate in Astronomy from the University of Michigan.

Chanda Prescod-Weinstein PH.D is currently a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow at the Observational Lab in Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt Maryland. Originally from Los Angeles California Dr. Prescod-Weinstein specializes in theoretical cosmology.

Dara Norman PH.D is a professor at the University of Washington. Dr. Norman grew up in the south side of Chicago Illinois. She went to MIT as an Undergraduate and worked at NASA Goddard in Maryland. Dr. Norman currently specializes in gravitational lensing, large scale structure and quasars (quasi-stellar objects). This year she was honored with the University’s Timeless Award for her contributions and accomplishments to astronomy. In 2009 she was invited to the Star Party at the White House.

Jeanette J. Epps PH.D from Syracuse NY is a NASA astronaut. She received her PH.D in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Marylan in 2000. Dr. Epps was selected in 2009 to be one of the 14 members of the 20th NASA astronaut class. She recently graduated from Astronaut Candidate Training.

Shirley Ann Jackson PH.D is the second African-American woman to earn a PH.D in physics and the first from MIT. In 2009 Dr. Jackson was appointed to serve on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. She is currently the President of the Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute.

(via rocketsandorscience)

scigrrrl:

Check out my new zine on women in science! 

We 💗 scigrrls!

LLS

(via women-in-science)